The Inuit Bible

"The Inuit: the aboriginal people of the North American arctic, sometimes referred to as Eskimo. Over a thousand years ago, they spread into Arctic Canada looking for a better life.

A syllabic writing system was introduced in the 1800s by Anglican missionaries. Before this the Inuits had no writing system.

But the only Bible was printed in the Latin alphabet—not the syllable characters used by the Inuit. Bible translation is time consuming! Especially in a language and culture vastly different from the context of the Bible.

But in 2012, after 34 arduous years of translation, a team of five Anglican Inuk ministers produced the first Inuit Bible—the entire translation done by mother-tongue speakers.

An Inuit-language Bible- bridging many linguistic and cultural gaps between Inuit and old Middle Eastern texts.

Engage with the Bible—it’s continuing story in its many languages!"

Share

More Book Minute Features

June 24, 2019

The Lost Gutenberg

Rare book collectors know the crown jewel of any library would be a complete Gutenberg Bible. Johannes Gutenberg produced perhaps 180 copies. Today, o...
June 17, 2019

The Catacombs

Some of the earliest known examples of Christian art portraying biblical figures are actually underground. In miles of tunnels outside the walls of Ro...
June 10, 2019

Shavuot

Shavuot—the Feast of Weeks, is celebrated seven weeks after Passover—commemorating the first fruits of the harvest, associated with the giving of the...