Women’s History: Corrie Ten Boom

Yad Vashem, Jerusalem’s Holocaust Museum, is a memorial to the six million Jews annihilated in Germany and Poland in World War II. In Hebrew, the name means “a memorial and a name”—an idiom from Isaiah 56:5, "I will give within my temple and its walls a memorial and a name.” But did you know that the museum honors the “Righteous Among the Nations,” planting trees to remember individuals who assisted the Jews?

Corrie Ten Boom is one of those honored. She, along with her Dutch family, provided a hiding place for Jews. When discovered, they were arrested and some spent months in a concentration camp. But Corrie survived! Her popular book, “The Hiding Place,” tells the story of her life in the camp, its title is taken from Psalm 119:114, “You are my hiding place and my shield; I hope in your Word.”

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