Elizabeth Fry: Advocate for Prison Reform

The daughter of a Victorian Quaker family, Elizabeth Fry was 18 when she heard a sermon on justice—a message that became a life-changing catalyst for thousands of women and children!

Elizabeth began collecting clothes for the poor, visiting the sick, even having Sunday school in her home to teach children to read. Urged to visit London’s Newgate Prison, she found hundreds of women and children in appalling conditions, resulting in her impassioned advocacy for prison reform.

She became the first woman to give evidence at a house of Commons committee inquiry into British prisons. Elizabeth Fry founded the Association for the Reformation of Female Prisoners in Newgate—to “.introduce them to knowledge of the holy scriptures, and to form in them. . .habits of order, sobriety, and industry.”

The Bible—life-changing in its impact!

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