Ernie Pyle: World War II’s Most Famous War Correspondent

Over 4,000 Allied troops were killed during the Battle of Normandy—D-Day—June 6, 1944. Ernie Pyle, one of the most highly revered war correspondents of World War II, was an eye witness. Over 300 newspapers carried his columns. Writing from foxholes, his writings became like “personal letters from the front” in millions of US homes.

Just after the invasion of Normandy he wrote what he described as a “jumbled row for mile on mile of socks, sewing kits, diaries, Bibles and hand grenades.” Pyle recalled picking up a pocket Bible from the strewn debris with a soldier’s name in it, putting it in his jacket, then laying it back down on the beach—one of thousands of small Bibles distributed to US troops in World War II, to carry in their pocket into battle.

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