Mary Sidney Herbert, The Countess of Pembroke

Sir Philip Sidney was one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan era—a poet, scholar, and valiant soldier.

He paved the way for the most important woman of the era—his sister—Mary Sidney Herbert, the Countess of Pembroke, who was a role model for women as a writer, translator, editor, and Protestant activist!

Mary understood the times in which she lived, and used every resource available to her, including her husband’s wealth and her significant position as a Sidney.

She became best known for her metric translation of Psalms 44–150, a project shared by her brother, using a poetic style expressed in the last stanza of Psalm 102:28:

“Then hope, who godly be, Or come of godly race:
Endless your bliss, as never ending he, His presence
Your unchanged place.”

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