Fools and Foolishness

It’s definitely one of the more light-hearted days of the year. . .or NOT.

No one really knows the origin of April Fool’s Day, but popular theory goes back to 1582 when Pope Gregory XIII adopted the Gregorian calendar, moving New Year’s Day from the end of March to January 1.
When some didn’t get the memo, they continued celebrating the New Year at the end of March and were “mocked for their folly!”
Whatever the origin, much has been said about “fools” and “foolishness” over the centuries, including a hundred or more references in the Bible predominately in the Wisdom literature of Proverbs and Psalms. The fool is constantly contrasted with the wise.
Even on this light-hearted of days—there’s reason to engage with the Bible—in all its wisdom for the ages!


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