The New Testament in Russian

Collection ID

BIB.004008

Type

Bible - Printed Book

Date

1823

Geography

Saint Petersburg, (Russia)

Language

Russian

Medium

Printed on paper

Dimensions

7.7 × 5 × 1.5 in. (19.7 × 12.7 × 3.8 cm)

Exhibit Location

Not on view


This is the first edition of the New Testament printed in Russian without parallel Church Slavonic text. Biblical translations into the common tongue occurred both earlier and later for Eastern Orthodox traditions than other places in Europe. Translations into Slavonic occurred due to missionary efforts in the 9th century, but translations into modern languages didn’t occur until the 19th century. In 1816, Tsar Aleksander I tasked the Russian Bible Society with printing the New Testament in Russian and Church Slavonic under the supervision of the Russian Orthodox Church. This edition of the New Testament was completed in 1821. It was later decided to print separate editions of the Russian and Church Slavonic texts, resulting in this New Testament from 1823. A complete Russian Bible, following the canon of the Russian Orthodox Church, was completed in 1876.

Printed in 1823 by the Russian Bible Society. Acquired by The Bible Museum in Goodyear, Arizona (Craig Lampe); Purchased in 2010 by Dr. Andrew Stimer;[1] Purchased in 2016 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Donated in 2017 to National Christian Foundation (later The Signatry) under the curatorial care of Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] Provenance information provided by Dr. Andrew Stimer.

Published References:

Stephen K. Batalden, Russian Bible Wars: Modern Scriptural Translation and Cultural Authority (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Judith Cohen Zacek, “The Russian Bible Society and the Russian Orthodox Church,” Church History 35, no. 4 (1966): 411–437.

description

This is the first edition of the New Testament printed in Russian without parallel Church Slavonic text. Biblical translations into the common tongue occurred both earlier and later for Eastern Orthodox traditions than other places in Europe. Translations into Slavonic occurred due to missionary efforts in the 9th century, but translations into modern languages didn’t occur until the 19th century. In 1816, Tsar Aleksander I tasked the Russian Bible Society with printing the New Testament in Russian and Church Slavonic under the supervision of the Russian Orthodox Church. This edition of the New Testament was completed in 1821. It was later decided to print separate editions of the Russian and Church Slavonic texts, resulting in this New Testament from 1823. A complete Russian Bible, following the canon of the Russian Orthodox Church, was completed in 1876.


provenance

Printed in 1823 by the Russian Bible Society. Acquired by The Bible Museum in Goodyear, Arizona (Craig Lampe); Purchased in 2010 by Dr. Andrew Stimer;[1] Purchased in 2016 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Donated in 2017 to National Christian Foundation (later The Signatry) under the curatorial care of Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] Provenance information provided by Dr. Andrew Stimer.

Published References:

Stephen K. Batalden, Russian Bible Wars: Modern Scriptural Translation and Cultural Authority (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Judith Cohen Zacek, “The Russian Bible Society and the Russian Orthodox Church,” Church History 35, no. 4 (1966): 411–437.


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