Gospels Diglot in Slavonic and Russian, 7th Edition

Gospels Diglot in Slavonic and Russian, 7th Edition

Collection ID

BIB.003831

Type

Bible - Printed Book

Date

1866

Geography

Saint Petersburg, (Russia)

Language

Church Slavonic and Russian

Medium

Printed on paper

Dimensions

8.7 × 6.1 × 1.2 in. (22 × 15.5 × 3 cm)

Exhibit Location

Not on view


Efforts to translate the Bible into modern Russian flourished with the establishment of the Russian Bible Society (RBS) in 1812. Prior to its establishment, the Bible was primarily available in the Church Slavonic recited in liturgical worship. A few efforts to translate the Bible into Russian exist before the establishment of the RBS, but these efforts were limited to only a few books and only reached a small audience. Following the closure of the RBS and a period of unofficial publication of the Russian text, the Holy Synod (the governing body of the Russian Orthodox Church) received approval from Tsar Alexander II to resume translation efforts. Although there were disagreements within the Synod (in part, due to a desire to maintain Church Slavonic as the sacred language of the Russian Orthodox Church), a Synodal edition of the four Gospels in Russian was eventually published in 1860. This edition presents the Church Slavonic and Russian text in two columns, with the Church Slavonic on the left and the Russian on the right. The biblical text is followed by a table of lessons that lists the Gospel readings throughout the year.

Printed in 1866 by Synodal Press, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Acquired by the Library of the Vilnius Realschule;[1] Acquired by Waleryan Dobużyński;[2] Acquired before 2010 by Christian Heritage Museum, Hagerstown, Maryland; Purchased in 2010 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, under the curatorial care of Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] A stamp on the title page says " библиотека Виленскаго реальнаго училища”, “the library of the Vilna Real School.” Realschules (Real Schools) were abolished in the Russian Empire after the October Revolution of 1917. Lithuania declared its independence in 1918, having been previously annexed by the Russian Empire. The stamp likely dates prior to the October 1917 Revolution.[2] There is a book plate inside the front cover with this name.

Published References:

Stephen K. Batalden, Russian Bible Wars: Modern Scriptural Translation and Cultural Authority (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).

Description

Efforts to translate the Bible into modern Russian flourished with the establishment of the Russian Bible Society (RBS) in 1812. Prior to its establishment, the Bible was primarily available in the Church Slavonic recited in liturgical worship. A few efforts to translate the Bible into Russian exist before the establishment of the RBS, but these efforts were limited to only a few books and only reached a small audience. Following the closure of the RBS and a period of unofficial publication of the Russian text, the Holy Synod (the governing body of the Russian Orthodox Church) received approval from Tsar Alexander II to resume translation efforts. Although there were disagreements within the Synod (in part, due to a desire to maintain Church Slavonic as the sacred language of the Russian Orthodox Church), a Synodal edition of the four Gospels in Russian was eventually published in 1860. This edition presents the Church Slavonic and Russian text in two columns, with the Church Slavonic on the left and the Russian on the right. The biblical text is followed by a table of lessons that lists the Gospel readings throughout the year.


Provenance

Printed in 1866 by Synodal Press, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Acquired by the Library of the Vilnius Realschule;[1] Acquired by Waleryan Dobużyński;[2] Acquired before 2010 by Christian Heritage Museum, Hagerstown, Maryland; Purchased in 2010 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, under the curatorial care of Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] A stamp on the title page says " библиотека Виленскаго реальнаго училища”, “the library of the Vilna Real School.” Realschules (Real Schools) were abolished in the Russian Empire after the October Revolution of 1917. Lithuania declared its independence in 1918, having been previously annexed by the Russian Empire. The stamp likely dates prior to the October 1917 Revolution.[2] There is a book plate inside the front cover with this name.

Published References:

Stephen K. Batalden, Russian Bible Wars: Modern Scriptural Translation and Cultural Authority (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013).


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