Parallel Bible: Erasmus’s Latin and Tyndale’s English New Testament

Parallel Bible: Erasmus’s Latin and Tyndale’s English New Testament

Collection ID

BIB.001151

Type

Bible - Printed Book

Date

1550

Geography

London, (England)

Language

English

Medium

Printed on paper

Dimensions

11 × 9 × 1 in. (27.9 × 22.9 × 2.5 cm)

Exhibit Location

One view in The History of the Bible, Revolutionary Words


The new Testament in Englishe after the greeke translation annexed wyth the translation of Erasmus in Latin. This copy of the New Testament sets William Tyndale’s 1534 English translation parallel with the fifth edition of Desiderius Erasmus’s Latin translation (1535). It is the fourth edition of a Tyndale/Erasmus edition of the New Testament, though the first in this smaller format. By presenting these texts together, an English speaker familiar with Latin could check the reliability of Tyndale’s work. Erasmus’s edition and translation, in Latin and Greek, was first published in 1516 as the Novum Instrumentum Omne; Tyndale’s English translation, which relied on Erasmus’s Greek text, was first published in 1526.

Printed on November 30, 1550, by John Cawood in London, England. Acquired by Craig Lampe; Purchased in 2009 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Donated in 2014 to Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.[1]

Notes: [1] A search submitted to Art Loss Register did not match any objects currently in their database (November 8, 2017; Ref: S00129743).

Select References:

Mark Rankin, “Tyndale, Erasmus, and the Early English Reformation,” Erasmus Studies 38, no. 2 (2018): 135–170.

Thomas Fulton, “English Bibles and Their Readers 1400–1700,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 47, no. 3 (2017): 415–435.

Douglas Parker, ed., William Roye’s An exhortation to the diligent studye of scripture and An exposition in to the seventh chaper of the postle to the Corinthians (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000).

description

The new Testament in Englishe after the greeke translation annexed wyth the translation of Erasmus in Latin. This copy of the New Testament sets William Tyndale’s 1534 English translation parallel with the fifth edition of Desiderius Erasmus’s Latin translation (1535). It is the fourth edition of a Tyndale/Erasmus edition of the New Testament, though the first in this smaller format. By presenting these texts together, an English speaker familiar with Latin could check the reliability of Tyndale’s work. Erasmus’s edition and translation, in Latin and Greek, was first published in 1516 as the Novum Instrumentum Omne; Tyndale’s English translation, which relied on Erasmus’s Greek text, was first published in 1526.


provenance

Printed on November 30, 1550, by John Cawood in London, England. Acquired by Craig Lampe; Purchased in 2009 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Donated in 2014 to Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.[1]

Notes: [1] A search submitted to Art Loss Register did not match any objects currently in their database (November 8, 2017; Ref: S00129743).

Select References:

Mark Rankin, “Tyndale, Erasmus, and the Early English Reformation,” Erasmus Studies 38, no. 2 (2018): 135–170.

Thomas Fulton, “English Bibles and Their Readers 1400–1700,” Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 47, no. 3 (2017): 415–435.

Douglas Parker, ed., William Roye’s An exhortation to the diligent studye of scripture and An exposition in to the seventh chaper of the postle to the Corinthians (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2000).


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