Draft of Release of Claims Concerning Receipt of Dowry

Draft of Release of Claims Concerning Receipt of Dowry

Collection ID

PAP.000379

Type

Papyrus

Date

August 7, 44 CE

Geography

Tebtunis, now Tell Umm el-Baragat, (Egypt)

Language

Greek

Medium

Papyrus, ink

Dimensions

11 × 7.1 in. (28 × 18 cm)

Exhibit Location

Not on view


This document preserves the date (August 7, 44 CE, during the reign of Claudius) and location (Tebtunis) of its creation in the first two lines. It is written in two separate hands. The top twenty-one lines are the product of a trained scribe working in the record office (grapheion) of Tebtunis. They state that Didyme (also known as Thenpsosneus) and her husband Eutychas are informing her brothers that she has received the dowry bequeathed to her by their father Herodion. Eutychas wrote the last ten lines in a far less practiced hand on behalf of his illiterate wife. In them, Didyme and Eutychus promise not to make further claims to the money.

Please note: The low-resolution photo of part of the papyrus will be replaced by a higher-resolution image of the complete papyrus after its publication.

Created August 7, 44 CE, by a scribe in the grapheion of Tebtunis.[1] Acquired (probably in 1922) by Rev. J. Balmer Showers (1879–1962);[2] Donated to Bonebrake Theological Seminary, later renamed United Theological Seminary; Acquired in 2009–2010 by Dirk Obbink, Oxford, England; Privately purchased in 2010 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Gifted in 2013 to Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] The papyrus was part of an archive created by the scribe Apion and his son Kronion at Tebtunis between 20 BCE and 56 CE. One hundred ninety-two other known documents from this archive are in Michigan, Cairo, and Leipzig. [2] Rev. J. Balmer Showers, later Bishop Showers, taught Greek at Bonebrake Theological Seminary (later renamed United Theological Seminary) in Dayton, Ohio from 1912–1926. According to R. J. Schork, “The Singular Circumstance of an Errant Papyrus,” Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics at Boston University 16.2 (Fall 2008): 35 and 39, Showers had donated to the Egypt Exploration Fund, which led to the Fund giving eight Oxyrhynchus papyri to the seminary. Showers supplemented the gift with this papyrus, which he had purchased privately. The United Methodist Archives and History Center (http://catalog.gcah.org/publicdata/gcah2443.htm) mentions that he had taken a trip to the “Far East” in 1922; this was likely when he visited Egypt and acquired the papyrus. Most of the Apion/Kronion archive from Tebtunis was purchased from antiquities dealers in Cairo between 1918 and 1926. (https://www.lib.umich.edu/files/collections/papyrus/exhibits/introduction/from_egypt_1.new.html)

Selected References

Jennifer Larson, “Draft of Release of Claims Involving Receipt of Dowry,” in Papyri of the Museum of the Bible, vol. 1, edited by Jeffrey Fish. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming.

R. J. Schork, “The Singular Circumstance of an Errant Papyrus,” Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics at Boston University 16.2 (Fall 2008): 25–47.

Description

This document preserves the date (August 7, 44 CE, during the reign of Claudius) and location (Tebtunis) of its creation in the first two lines. It is written in two separate hands. The top twenty-one lines are the product of a trained scribe working in the record office (grapheion) of Tebtunis. They state that Didyme (also known as Thenpsosneus) and her husband Eutychas are informing her brothers that she has received the dowry bequeathed to her by their father Herodion. Eutychas wrote the last ten lines in a far less practiced hand on behalf of his illiterate wife. In them, Didyme and Eutychus promise not to make further claims to the money.

Please note: The low-resolution photo of part of the papyrus will be replaced by a higher-resolution image of the complete papyrus after its publication.


Provenance

Created August 7, 44 CE, by a scribe in the grapheion of Tebtunis.[1] Acquired (probably in 1922) by Rev. J. Balmer Showers (1879–1962);[2] Donated to Bonebrake Theological Seminary, later renamed United Theological Seminary; Acquired in 2009–2010 by Dirk Obbink, Oxford, England; Privately purchased in 2010 by Green Collection, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Gifted in 2013 to Museum of the Bible, Washington, DC.

Notes: [1] The papyrus was part of an archive created by the scribe Apion and his son Kronion at Tebtunis between 20 BCE and 56 CE. One hundred ninety-two other known documents from this archive are in Michigan, Cairo, and Leipzig. [2] Rev. J. Balmer Showers, later Bishop Showers, taught Greek at Bonebrake Theological Seminary (later renamed United Theological Seminary) in Dayton, Ohio from 1912–1926. According to R. J. Schork, “The Singular Circumstance of an Errant Papyrus,” Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics at Boston University 16.2 (Fall 2008): 35 and 39, Showers had donated to the Egypt Exploration Fund, which led to the Fund giving eight Oxyrhynchus papyri to the seminary. Showers supplemented the gift with this papyrus, which he had purchased privately. The United Methodist Archives and History Center (http://catalog.gcah.org/publicdata/gcah2443.htm) mentions that he had taken a trip to the “Far East” in 1922; this was likely when he visited Egypt and acquired the papyrus. Most of the Apion/Kronion archive from Tebtunis was purchased from antiquities dealers in Cairo between 1918 and 1926. (https://www.lib.umich.edu/files/collections/papyrus/exhibits/introduction/from_egypt_1.new.html)

Selected References

Jennifer Larson, “Draft of Release of Claims Involving Receipt of Dowry,” in Papyri of the Museum of the Bible, vol. 1, edited by Jeffrey Fish. Leiden: Brill, forthcoming.

R. J. Schork, “The Singular Circumstance of an Errant Papyrus,” Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics at Boston University 16.2 (Fall 2008): 25–47.


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