Birthplace of the Vulgate

Imagine a cave beneath a church in Bethlehem being the birthplace of the most enduring version of the Bible ever edited or produced!

St. Jerome spent 30 years in what would today be called a “basement” of the Church of the Nativity—editing and correcting the Old Latin manuscripts of the Bible—"now known as the Vulgate"—the Bible of the Western church for 1,000 years.

For those hundreds of years, Jerome’s version was the only Bible in universal use in Europe. And perhaps another significant influence was that it was the basis of the first complete English version of the Bible, the Wycliffe translation.

For more than 2,000 years, translation has been an important part of the Bible’s history—making it accessible to many different cultures—yet remaining true to the original text.

Engage with the Bible—with this Book of books!

Share

More Book Minute Features

September 21, 2020

Septembertestament

Martin Luther is best known for the 95 Theses written in 1517. But did you know he was the first to translate the Bible into an easy-to-read, everyday...
September 14, 2020

Zion National Park

Zion National Park is Utah’s first National Park. The official park tour guide explains how Zion Canyon got its name from the Bible, specifically Isai...
September 07, 2020

Ostrog Bible

Church Slavonic is the conservative Slavic liturgical language used by the Orthodox Church in Eastern European countries including Bulgaria, Russia, S...