William Tyndale, Protestant Reformer

The real-life story of William Tyndale is more dramatic than any novelist could pen. Betrayed by a friend, Tyndale was arrested for heresy by imperial authorities and imprisoned for over a year near Brussels. In 1536, William Tyndale was tried and convicted of heresy and treason. He was strangled and put to death, then burned at the stake. The apparent reason being his English translation of the Bible. Tyndale published his first edition of the New Testament in 1526. He ultimately succeeded in finishing the Pentateuch, the book of Jonah, and some of the books of the Old Testament before being arrested and executed in 1536. Printings of Tyndale’s translations, among them a 1536 edition, are on display at Museum of the Bible.

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