William Tyndale, Protestant Reformer

The real-life story of William Tyndale is more dramatic than any novelist could pen. Betrayed by a friend, Tyndale was arrested for heresy by imperial authorities and imprisoned for over a year near Brussels. In 1536, William Tyndale was tried and convicted of heresy and treason. He was strangled and put to death, then burned at the stake. The apparent reason being his English translation of the Bible. Tyndale published his first edition of the New Testament in 1526. He ultimately succeeded in finishing the Pentateuch, the book of Jonah, and some of the books of the Old Testament before being arrested and executed in 1536. Printings of Tyndale’s translations, among them a 1536 edition, are on display at Museum of the Bible.

Share

More Book Minute Features

September 21, 2020

Septembertestament

Martin Luther is best known for the 95 Theses written in 1517. But did you know he was the first to translate the Bible into an easy-to-read, everyday...
September 14, 2020

Zion National Park

Zion National Park is Utah’s first National Park. The official park tour guide explains how Zion Canyon got its name from the Bible, specifically Isai...
September 07, 2020

Ostrog Bible

Church Slavonic is the conservative Slavic liturgical language used by the Orthodox Church in Eastern European countries including Bulgaria, Russia, S...