Diet of Augsburg and the Augsburg Confession

The Augsburg Confession, presented to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Augsburg on June 25, 1530, became one of the most pivotal documents of the Protestant Reformation. Written by Luther’s colleague, German Reformer Philipp Melanchthon, the confession clearly articulated Lutheran theological convictions. It was a document intended to restore political and religious unity in the free territories of Germany.

It became the primary confession of faith for the Lutheran Church. Melanchthon used biblical references throughout each of the 28 articles of confession, including Romans 3 and 4 in the article outlining Luther’s argument for justification by faith: “That . . . men cannot be justified before God by their own strength, merits, or works, but are freely justified for Christ’s sake, through faith.”

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