Women’s History: Evangeline Booth

In 1904, Evangeline Booth became director of the Salvation Army operations in the US, an organization founded in London by her parents in 1865 to help the poor of London. It was a role in which she served for thirty years, and played a significant role in urging the United States to allow Salvation Army women to serve overseas during World War I assisting the troops.

In 1919, Evangeline Booth was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal by President Woodrow Wilson. She described the work of the Salvation Army, using words from John 1, “an army of hosts of men and women who cry in all the languages of the earth, ‘Behold the Lamb of God who taketh away the sin of the world.’” In 1934, Evangeline Booth became the fourth general of the International Salvation Army, its first woman to serve as general.

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