The Bible in the Age of Technology

Digital photography, multispectral and forensic imaging, and sophisticated data retrieval methods are new digital tools revolutionizing biblical research. The Early Manuscripts Electronic Library—or EMEL for short—and the Lazarus Project partnered with Museum of the Bible on an exciting project. Scholars used state-of-the-art spectral-imaging to study the Codex Climaci Rescriptus, a late ninth-century manuscript from the Museum Collections.

This manuscript consists of different layers of texts, usually two, but sometimes three, from different time periods. The imaging project digitally resurrects this erased writing, including biblical texts from centuries earlier in Greek and Christian Palestinian Aramaic. Scholars can also collect data to analyze ink and parchments of other ancient manuscripts. There’s no question, technology is impacting how we read and study the Bible.

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