The Reformers: William Tyndale

William Tyndale was a brilliant man, proficient in Hebrew and Greek. His passion was to produce an English version of the Bible. A passion he would pay for with his life. Tyndale said: “It hath pleased God to send unto our Englishmen, even to as many as genuinely desire it, the Scripture in their mother tongue.”

His first English translation of the New Testament was smuggled into England. It was hotly debated among church officials, who called it “perilous and made for an evil purpose.” By 1536, Tyndale was condemned as a heretic and given an opportunity to recant. When he refused, he was strangled and set on fire.

To learn more about the Protestant Reformation visit www.museumofthebible.org/reformation.

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