Yom Kippur: Day of Atonement

Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is perhaps the most important holiday in the Jewish calendar. It marks the end of a period of introspection and repentance. No work is performed, and most of the holiday is spent in prayer.

A twenty-five-hour fast begins at sunset on September 29, ending after nightfall on September 30. Did you know that the final service includes the reading of the book of Jonah? It’s read as a reminder of God’s mercy.

The Torah readings for the day are from Leviticus 16:34: “This shall be to you a law for all time: to make atonement for the Israelites for all their sins once a year.”

Share

More Book Minute Features

June 17, 2019

The Catacombs

Some of the earliest known examples of Christian art portraying biblical figures are actually underground. In miles of tunnels outside the walls of Ro...
June 10, 2019

Shavout

Shavout—the Feast of Weeks, is celebrated seven weeks after Passover—commemorating the first fruits of the harvest, associated with the giving of the...
June 03, 2019

Going Into D-Day With the Bible

In the hours before the Allied invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944—D-Day—troops were preparing to land on a 50-mile stretch of French coastline. T...