John Eliot: Apostle to the Indians

Baptized on August 5, 1604, John Eliot’s eighty-six years earned him respect and the legacy as the “Apostle to the Indians.” He was a Puritan who cared deeply for the Native Americans of New England—an unpopular stance in the colonies.

But Eliot learned to speak the Wôpanâak language fluently, and with the help of a Native American named John Sassamon, he translated the Bible into that language. Tensions between Native Americans and English colonists erupted, leading to King Philip’s War in 1675. By the end of the war, nearly all copies of the Wôpanâak-language Bible were destroyed.

But when Museum of the Bible opens in November 2017, on display in the "Bible in America” exhibit, will be the rare, first edition of Elliot’s translation—the first Bible printed in America!

Share

More Book Minute Features

January 20, 2020

Presidential Inaugurals and the Bible — Ronald Rea...

At a news conference shortly after his 1985 inauguration, Ronald Reagan said; “I’ve found that the Bible contains an answer to just about everything a...
January 13, 2020

Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison

On January 13, 1968, Johnny Cash gave, perhaps, his most memorable performance. Following the biblical admonition to remember and visit those in priso...
January 06, 2020

Hebrew Cantillation

When it comes to music, the vocal tradition of chanting the Torah is central to Jewish religious services and dates to ancient times. The Hebrew Bible...