John Eliot: Apostle to the Indians

Baptized on August 5, 1604, John Eliot’s eighty-six years earned him respect and the legacy as the “Apostle to the Indians.” He was a Puritan who cared deeply for the Native Americans of New England—an unpopular stance in the colonies.

But Eliot learned to speak the Wôpanâak language fluently, and with the help of a Native American named John Sassamon, he translated the Bible into that language. Tensions between Native Americans and English colonists erupted, leading to King Philip’s War in 1675. By the end of the war, nearly all copies of the Wôpanâak-language Bible were destroyed.

But when Museum of the Bible opens in November 2017, on display in the "Bible in America” exhibit, will be the rare, first edition of Elliot’s translation—the first Bible printed in America!

Share

More Book Minute Features

December 11, 2017

The Wyman Fragment

A fragment may be just a small piece, but in the case of the Wyman fragment, dating from the third century, a highly significant piece. It’s a glimpse...
December 06, 2017

Read the Book: A New Year’s Resolution

It’s that time of year when we start thinking about losing weight, working out, and generally making decisions to—uh—make better decisions? “New Year’...
December 15, 2017

A Christmas Classic : The Lion, the Witch, and th...

“The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” known by many children and adults around the world from the Disney movie released in December 2005, has becom...