Helen Keller: Inspiring Writer and Lecturer

Helen Keller was eighty-seven when she died on June 1, 1968, having lived without sight or hearing since she was nineteen months old—yet becoming a world-renowned writer and lecturer!
Special education for the deaf and the blind was unheard of in rural Alabama in 1880, but Helen Keller was quite a stubborn pupil!

Anne (Annie) Sullivan, herself partially blind, had learned how to communicate at the Perkins School for the Blind using hand signals. She was hired by the Keller family to teach the “signing” language to their daughter.

Helen made remarkable progress in the years of Anne Sullivan’s tutoring, ultimately graduating cum laude from Radcliffe and while there writing her first autobiography, The Story of My Life.
In later years, Helen credited her eagerness for knowledge to the choice of books introduced to her by Anne Sullivan—including the Bible! And in a thought mirroring 2 Corinthians 4:18, Helen said the Bible gave her a “deep comforting sense that things seen are temporal and things unseen are eternal.”

Engage with the Bible—in its impact and influence!


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