T.S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot is perhaps best known for his clever verse made popular in the musical, “Cats!”

But his extensive writings were acknowledged in a 1948 Nobel Prize for Literature!

In 1927 Eliot was confirmed in the Church of England. But it was in 1930 with his poem, “Ash Wednesday,” after he became an Anglican, that his poems included biblical references, including the quote “shall these bones live?” from Ezekiel 37.

Eliot believed his “finest” achievement was his religious poem, “Four Quartets”—with broad themes of inspiration from the Bible.

In an allusion to Acts 2 he wrote: “The dove descending breaks the air with flame of incandescent terror. . .”

And his 1927 poem, “Journey of the Magi,” is based on the story of the magi traveling to worship Jesus found in the Gospel of Matthew.

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