The Bishop’s Bible of 1568

You could say the Bishop’s Bible of 1568 was the “rough draft” for the King James Bible of 1611!

But the Bishop’s Bible itself was a response to a popular, but controversial Bible—the Geneva Bible produced by Protestants living in Geneva.

When Queen Elizabeth took the throne, she and church officials, were concerned about the controversial marginal notes that seemed to challenge the authority of the church and the monarchy!

As a result, the Church of England published the Bishop’s Bible in 1568. A Bible meant to update the authorized “Great Bible” of 1539, described for its unusual size as a pulpit Bible.

The Bishop’s Bible became the second authorized Bible in the Church of England, making way for the King James Bible of 1611, still in great demand today.

Share

More Book Minute Features

October 15, 2018

Phillis Wheatley

In 1773, Phillis Wheatley was freed from slavery and became the first African American to publish a book of poetry. She was bought by John and Susanna...
October 08, 2018

A Presidential Month

October is the most prolific month of the year to celebrate the birthdays of US Presidents—John Adams, Rutherford Hayes, Chester Arthur, Theodore Roos...
October 01, 2018

Lands of the Bible: Virtual Reality

Last year, a record-breaking number of people visited Israel—more than 3 million—800,000 of which were Americans; a number that keeps increasing. But...

Click to Expand