The Bishop’s Bible of 1568

You could say the Bishop’s Bible of 1568 was the “rough draft” for the King James Bible of 1611!

But the Bishop’s Bible itself was a response to a popular, but controversial Bible—the Geneva Bible produced by Protestants living in Geneva.

When Queen Elizabeth took the throne, she and church officials, were concerned about the controversial marginal notes that seemed to challenge the authority of the church and the monarchy!

As a result, the Church of England published the Bishop’s Bible in 1568. A Bible meant to update the authorized “Great Bible” of 1539, described for its unusual size as a pulpit Bible.

The Bishop’s Bible became the second authorized Bible in the Church of England, making way for the King James Bible of 1611, still in great demand today.

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