Abraham Lincoln

By March 4, 1865, the United States was days away from the end of the tragic Civil War, and from the steps of the U.S. Capitol, President Abraham Lincoln addressed the nation in his second inaugural address.

He said: “Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible. . .each invokes His aid against the other.”

And invoking Matthew 18:7, Lincoln said, “But let us judge not that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered; that of neither has been answered fully.”

And from Psalm 19:9, “. . .as said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said, the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”

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