Harriet Beecher Stowe and “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”

Under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, any black person accused of being a runaway was not allowed a trial or to testify in their own defense.

But in 1852, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” helped set off a maelstrom of debate about slavery, adding to an already raging fire—resulting in the Civil War.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin helped to “personalize” the cruelty and political issues surrounding slavery. There are over one hundred biblical references or allusions in thirty-eight of the novel’s forty-eight chapters.

Making reference to the book of Psalms, Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote in the preface:

“. . .the great cause of human liberty is in the hands of the One of whom it is said: 'He shall redeem their soul from deceit and violence, and precious shall their blood be in His sight.'”

Engage with the Bible—with this Book of all books!

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