Frederick Douglass

Born a slave, by the end of the 19th century, Frederick Douglass was a leading abolitionist against slavery, an advocate for women’s rights, a diplomat and an adviser to presidents!

During the Civil War, he conferred with President Lincoln, addressing the treatment of black soldiers.

In his 1852 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” he used Psalm 137 to describe the plight of slaves:

“We wept when we remembered Zion. . .for there, they that carried us away captive, required of us a song.”

And referencing Romans 10:8:

“And in the darkest hours of my career in slavery this living word of faith and spirt of hope departed not from me. . .to cheer me through the gloom.”

The Bible—impacting the movement against slavery!

Share

More Book Minute Features

July 06, 2020

Mary Jones's Bible

For Welsh children of years past, the story of Mary Jones and her Bible is legendary. In 1563, Parliament passed a law allowing for the translation of...
June 29, 2020

Mendelssohn’s Fifth— Symphony for the Reformation

The Augsburg Confession of 1530 defined the theological beliefs of Martin Luther, becoming one of the most important documents of the Protestant Refor...
June 22, 2020

Quoting the Bible -

“Cleanliness is next to godliness! A verse often quoted from the Bible—but one that isn’t IN the Bible! It's sound advice, but we often use wise...