Frederick Douglass

Born a slave, by the end of the 19th century, Frederick Douglass was a leading abolitionist against slavery, an advocate for women’s rights, a diplomat and an adviser to presidents!

During the Civil War, he conferred with President Lincoln, addressing the treatment of black soldiers.

In his 1852 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” he used Psalm 137 to describe the plight of slaves:

“We wept when we remembered Zion. . .for there, they that carried us away captive, required of us a song.”

And referencing Romans 10:8:

“And in the darkest hours of my career in slavery this living word of faith and spirt of hope departed not from me. . .to cheer me through the gloom.”

The Bible—impacting the movement against slavery!

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