The Calov Bible

Author Lisa Nichols Hickman says in her book, Writing in the Margins: “[a] margin acts as a bridge from the text of [the Bible] to the context of this world. It is sacred space.”
In 1830s Philadelphia, a stack of old books, including a Bible commentary, was purchased for a family library. When a friend of the family, a Lutheran pastor, opened the commentary by 17th-century theologian Abraham Calov on Martin Luther’s translation of the Bible, he recognized a familiar signature: Johann Sebastian Bach.
In the commentary were more than 300 markings and underlining, and 25 marginal notes—noting biblical texts with musical insights.
It came to be known as the Calov Bible—and was credited with the inspiration for more than a thousand of Bach’s musical works.
Engage with the Bible! Create your own bridge from centuries past in the continuing impact and influence of this book of books!


More Book Minute Features

March 16, 2018

Corita Kent: Pop Art and the Bible

Pop art and the Bible? Created by a woman wearing a habit? Sister Corita Kent’s silkscreen pop art has been compared to Andy Warhol’s more famous work...
March 15, 2018

Beware the Ides of March

Today recalls the famous quote from William Shakespeare’s, Julius Caesar, warning him to be careful—to “BEWARE THE IDES OF MARCH!" William Shakespeare...
March 14, 2018

Mike Jarvis, Florida Atlantic University Head Bask...

In March 2014, Florida Atlantic University fell five points short of advancing in the 2014 Conference USA Basketball Tournament. Head coach Mike Jarvi...