The Calov Bible

Author Lisa Nichols Hickman says in her book, Writing in the Margins: “[a] margin acts as a bridge from the text of [the Bible] to the context of this world. It is sacred space.”
In 1830s Philadelphia, a stack of old books, including a Bible commentary, was purchased for a family library. When a friend of the family, a Lutheran pastor, opened the commentary by 17th-century theologian Abraham Calov on Martin Luther’s translation of the Bible, he recognized a familiar signature: Johann Sebastian Bach.
In the commentary were more than 300 markings and underlining, and 25 marginal notes—noting biblical texts with musical insights.
It came to be known as the Calov Bible—and was credited with the inspiration for more than a thousand of Bach’s musical works.
Engage with the Bible! Create your own bridge from centuries past in the continuing impact and influence of this book of books!

Share

More Book Minute Features

July 17, 2018

UNCIAL Script

Using ALL CAPS in today’s written communication can mean everything from HIGHLY IMPORTANT to URGENT. Or if you’re texting, it’s akin to SHOUTING! Howe...
July 18, 2018

The Story of Mary Jones and Her Bible

For Welsh children of years past, the story of Mary Jones and her Bible is legendary. In 1563, Parliament passed a law allowing for the translation of...
July 16, 2018

The Law of Moses for Children

When you think of your child beginning to read the Bible, what book of the Bible would you start with? Did you know that Jewish children begin their B...

Click to Expand