The Calov Bible

Author Lisa Nichols Hickman says in her book, Writing in the Margins: “[a] margin acts as a bridge from the text of [the Bible] to the context of this world. It is sacred space.”
In 1830s Philadelphia, a stack of old books, including a Bible commentary, was purchased for a family library. When a friend of the family, a Lutheran pastor, opened the commentary by 17th-century theologian Abraham Calov on Martin Luther’s translation of the Bible, he recognized a familiar signature: Johann Sebastian Bach.
In the commentary were more than 300 markings and underlining, and 25 marginal notes—noting biblical texts with musical insights.
It came to be known as the Calov Bible—and was credited with the inspiration for more than a thousand of Bach’s musical works.
Engage with the Bible! Create your own bridge from centuries past in the continuing impact and influence of this book of books!

Share

More Book Minute Features

August 19, 2019

Hieroglyphic Bibles

Millions of Bibles are published each year for children — in all sizes, shapes and colors — in a variety of translations. But perhaps none are more in...
August 12, 2019

Wycliffe Translators Origins

In 1917, a missionary named William Cameron Townsend went to Guatemala to sell Spanish Bibles. He was shocked when many people couldn’t understand the...
August 05, 2019

Five Presidential Birthdays

Five former US presidents have birthdays in August, with the oldest being Benjamin Harrison, followed by Herbert Hoover, Lyndon Johnson, Bill Clinton...