The Calov Bible

Author Lisa Nichols Hickman says in her book, Writing in the Margins: “[a] margin acts as a bridge from the text of [the Bible] to the context of this world. It is sacred space.”
In 1830s Philadelphia, a stack of old books, including a Bible commentary, was purchased for a family library. When a friend of the family, a Lutheran pastor, opened the commentary by 17th-century theologian Abraham Calov on Martin Luther’s translation of the Bible, he recognized a familiar signature: Johann Sebastian Bach.
In the commentary were more than 300 markings and underlining, and 25 marginal notes—noting biblical texts with musical insights.
It came to be known as the Calov Bible—and was credited with the inspiration for more than a thousand of Bach’s musical works.
Engage with the Bible! Create your own bridge from centuries past in the continuing impact and influence of this book of books!

Share

More Book Minute Features

January 27, 2020

The Washington Monument and Exodus 28:36

The Washington Monument, at 555 feet, is the tallest public structure in Washington, DC, and is located on the National Mall. It took thirty-six years...
January 20, 2020

Presidential Inaugurals and the Bible — Ronald Rea...

At a news conference shortly after his 1985 inauguration, Ronald Reagan said; “I’ve found that the Bible contains an answer to just about everything a...
January 13, 2020

Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison

On January 13, 1968, Johnny Cash gave, perhaps, his most memorable performance. Following the biblical admonition to remember and visit those in priso...