Harriett Tubman: a Cook, a Nurse, and a Spy

The “Underground Railroad” symbolized the network of secret routes and safe houses used by slaves in the 19th century in their escape to free states.

And one of the most famous “conductors” was Harriet Tubman, herself born a slave.

Harriet Tubman escaped to Pennsylvania in 1849, but was never satisfied to have secured only her own freedom. Over 10 years, she made up to 19 trips to the South, helping as many as 300 slaves to escape.

And in all her journeys she said, “I never lost a passenger.” Earning the nickname, “Moses”—after the biblical prophet who led his people to freedom—fellow abolitionists said her strength came from her faith in God as a “deliverer and protector of the weak.”

Harriet Tubman will soon become the first African-American to appear on US currency—on the $20 bill.

Engage with the Bible in its narrative of hope for the oppressed!


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